7 Soul-Feeding Podcasts for the Hustling Creative

7 Soul-Feeding Podcasts for the Hustling Creative

For a little over a year now, I’ve added podcasts to my list of go-to resources as I embark on this creative-hustler journey. I don’t know what took me so long to see the importance of these info-filled/action packed weekly episodes but I’m glad I finally came to my senses. There are a handful of podcasts that I keep in rotation that have been imperative for my creative flow and I’d be remiss if I didn’t share with my creative tribe. Some of which you may know and some of which I may be putting you on to. Either way, break out your iphone and subscribe. Tell them Alana sent you 🙂

iamalanamarie.com

Side Hustle w/Soul Podcast with Dielle Charon

This podcast is hosted by Dielle Charon, a passionate business coach whose primary mission is to assist service-based entrepreneurs and coaches sign clients in their side hustles. She gives a healthy balance of guest commentary as well as provide her own insight about the ins and outs of creative entrepreneurship in 30 minutes or less. She even includes mini exercises for her listeners to become more clear in identifying the purpose behind their brands. This has quickly become a fav of mine.

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Blessed + Bossed Up w/Tatum Tamia

This podcast has truly created its own lane. There are many content creators that cater to the aspiring entrepreneur but Blessed + Bossed Up speaks to the creative with a heart for The Creator. She speaks on the importance of keeping God at the core of all decision making and as someone who began her digital content journey with a faith-based blog, this drew me back to my roots. She preaches without being preachy and her episodes are very relatable and relevant.

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The Freelance Friday Podcast w/ Latasha James

Latasha James is all things creative: a social media strategist, podcast host, youtuber and a personal branding & business coach. I enjoy her podcast for her short/sweet tips and her pragmatism. I happen to follow her on several platforms (IG: @ajourneyeast & her Facebook Group: Money Making Micro-Influencer) and she always keeps her audience engaged.

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The Dave Ramsey Show

I’m sure most of us creatives enjoy the idea of creating content as artists but we’d be lying if we said we don’t desire to make money off of our craft. If you are anything like me, you are probably turned off by the thought of all that goes into maintaining and sustaining our creative endeavors that’s NOT creative. I JUST WANNA CREATE! But if I’m trying to make some money, I need to have a practical understanding of money management in ALL areas of my life. Plus, Dave is so pragmatic with his commentary. He don’t play.

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Side Hustle Pro with Nicaila Matthews Okome

Nicaila is definitely a Boss Babe of digital content. Once I hopped on the podcast bandwagon, Side Hustle Pro was the first podcast I subscribed to. What I appreciate most about this podcast is, there are so many different guests on the show with varying backgrounds and businesses.  I may not always be privy to every industry of the side hustlers on the show or be personally interested in that industry BUT all the tips, tricks, and lessons learned within each episode are transferable for creatives within any industry. This is a great introductory podcast for new found creatives.

iamalanamarie.com, podcasts

She’s a Creative Podcast w/Kay H

This podcast is a new found fav. I learned about Kay via instagram and I am in love with her content. All of her content is geared towards female entrepreneurs – to help them grow and get sales on media. I find her to be very relatable and passionate about sharing her gifts and helping others tap into their own. Sis has some great content and guests on her podcast, and I’ve found myself implementing what I’ve learned into my own work.

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The Potter’s House At One LA

My brain can stay on 1000 if I allow it and I can often neglect necessary moments of silence and stillness to connect with my creator.  I appreciate this podcast for not having anything to do with my creative passions BUT feeds my spirit which in turn makes me a better creative. I love the relationship between The Robert’s and how each sermon hits on something I am either currently enduring or have of past.

I know there are several more heavy-hitting podcasts that I have yet to come across. What are you currently subscribed to? Leave suggestions in the comments below.

 

Momager Recap: The Gathering of Mom Bosses

Momager Recap: The Gathering of Mom Bosses

Kris Jenner, Jonetta Patton (Usher Raymond’s mom), and Mama Knowles may be the first to come to mind when you hear the term momager, but they certainly are not the only ones working towards the success of their children.

Local communications expert, founder of Booked Enterprise and #momboss extraordinaire, Winnie Elizabeth, recently  hosted a Momagers Day Class at the CIC @ CET building in St. Louis, MO. What is a Momager you ask? A Momager serves in the role of a business manager over their child(rens) business. While the day class consisted of both novice and veteran momagers, they could all relate to one another when discussing the highs and lows of merging business and family life with their children.

iamalanamarie, momager

Winnie

The intimate afternoon began with a warm welcome from Tamara Robinson, entrepreneur and co-author of #MomBoss. The atmosphere was set with each attendee sharing a little bit about themselves and their story – including and outside of motherhood; Followed by the first speaker of the afternoon, Jaqui Rogers, Founder of Mama2Mama, LLC and Co-Founder & Co-Organizer of the Crooked Room Conference.

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Tamara

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Jaqui

Jaqui’s area of expertise centers around the education sector and highlights the notion that education occurs beyond the four walls of a school building. She is a natural facilitator with a heart for service.

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Moms were tasked with identifying their tribe – uniquely defined by everyone – and share the characteristics of their ideal tribe. Needless to say, this opened up an impromptu exchange of stories, contacts, hugs & tears.

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Arriel Biggs is one to ask, “what don’t you do?” She’s a non-profit expert, manager of her son’s many entrepreneurial endeavors, co-author of #MomBoss and a cancer survivor. She is regarded as the veteran of the group with years of industry expertise that she is willing and ready to share when asked.

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Arriel

The brain behind the day class, Winnie Elizabeth, commanded eyes to the front when she gathered a chair and centered herself to the room. Most known as the mother of Sidney Keys III, the founder of an all boys book club focused on encouraging literacy amongst young African-American males titled Books N Bros, LLC. Books N Bros has garnered much press and national attention but many aren’t so familiar with the hard-working hands that have helped the book club excel to its current state.

iamalanamarie, momager

Winnie held nothing back with highlighting her boss moments, accolades, and areas of expertise, but was just as candid with sharing her challenging moments, bouts with depression, and getting her car repossessed when Books N Bros was at the height of its success. Even in her most vulnerable moments, as I am sure many mothers can relate, she is grateful for those seasons and for the opportunity to share her story with other entrepreneurial mothers who may be feeling doubt or discouragement throughout the journey.

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The afternoon came full-circle with a much needed word from therapist Richelle Moore who said, “It is ok, to not be ok sometimes.” The entrepreneurial journey and the parenting journey are challenging within their own rights so to combine the two is not a task for the faint at heart. Richelle reiterated the importance of moms taking care of themselves first and foremost, with our mental health being just as important as the endeavors we are embarking on.

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Richelle

This day class has now become a shared experience amongst all the ladies and they can now look back on what they’ve learned for reference and look to each other for insight, suggestions, and support.Thank you Winnie for creating this space for women who are invested in the success of not only their children but themselves as well. As a mother to a 9-year-old with her own goals and ambitions, I am grateful to have been in a space with moms who have been in the game for a minute and willing to share the ins, out, ups and downs of the momager journey.

Check out what all the speakers of the Momager Day Class are up to.

Winnie

IG: @iamwinnieelizabeth

Blog: thewirehangerbywinnie.com

Website: Booked Enterprise & booksnbros.com

Arielle

IG: @arrielbiggs

Website: supportyourbizkid.com

Jaqui 

IG: @thecrookedroomconference & @mama2mamallc

Website: Crookedroomconference.com & mama2mama.net

Tamara

IG: @tamararobinson.onsulting & @dreamchasers_stl

Rochelle

IG: @restorecounselingandwellness

 

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries || Briana M. Andrews

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries || Briana M. Andrews

We’ve reached week 4 of the #BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries and I hope you’ve been nothing short of inspired by reading about Brittney, Joyce, & Tirrea and their journey’s thus far.

This week, we spoke to Briana M. Andrews, a 19-year-old undergrad student and content creator from New York with wisdom and artistry beyond her years.

How long have you been in the industry and what made you want to go into this field?

February 2017 is when I officially transitioned from being a hobbyist. I’ve been in the industry a little over two years.  I was always an artist and a right-brained, visual creative. I took an interest in photography and videography during middle-school and never looked back.  I started with a standard point-and-shoot and portable HD camera. Later, I moved up to working with SLRs and cinema cameras.

Have you ever dealt with imposter syndrome in this industry? If so, how did you overcome that?

Luckily for me, no, I haven’t dealt with imposter syndrome.  I’m confident in my abilities and always eager to learn. I take constructive criticism and grow from it.  Art is highly subjective and everything is opinionated, so it’s a matter of taste and personal preference. It is important to have thick-skin, but also important not to internalize all commentary.  If you have technical proficiency and hone your craft, the confidence comes with time. For some people, actively working in a smaller market before seeking work in New York or Los Angeles helps.

What would you identify as your most successful moment up to this point in your career?

I feel like the best is yet to come, however, the creation of comedic-short, How to Watch was definitely a huge moment of pride and ultimately led to the creation of my company, BibbyFame Digital, LLC.   Up until that point, I had worked on projects as a production assistant (PA), director of photography (DP) and behind-the-scenes (BTS), but never spearheaded an original film from start to finish.  For this film, I conceptualized it, wrote it, scouted locations, created the look-book, shot-list, production book, casted it, funded it, shot it, promoted it, edited it and showcased it.  I don’t expect to be a one-woman-army, but having an idea of how things work from soup-to-nuts gives me a greater appreciation and overall understanding of each part that goes into a creative work.  It also provides me with the ability to communicate intelligibly individuals I delegate tasks to. This process gave me the confidence I needed to use my ability for practical applications. I assist businesses with visually conveying their stories.

How would you describe your artistic style?

My stories tend to feature a strong, female-lead.  Whenever possible, I love to make use of natural lighting.  I inject myself in all of my work so my style is female-centric and blends cinema with visual art and fashion.  

Do you have a film bucket list? If so, what are you still wanting to do?

Most definitely!  I have a slew of things on my film bucket list and next month, I’ll finally be able to cross one off.  I always wanted to work on a project with an all-female crew; a project where everyone from the director, to producer, to camera-operator, production assistant and behind-the-scenes … are all women.  I wanted the experience, combined with support and solidarity, to culminate in a film where we demonstrate our collective capabilities. I am the producer of a docu-series named To Each, Her Throne that will be shot in April 2019.  Working with the director and associate director has been a phenomenal experience thus far.  It will feature a talented female cast and the funding partially comes from an IndieGogo campaign.  Also, I just found out a few days ago that out of hundreds of applicants, I was selected for the New York: Women’s Weekend Film Challenge.  It’ll be shooting BTS, and our film will be screened in the Museum of Moving Image late next month. I am really excited about both opportunities.

What would you say to other Black female creatives wanting to break into the industry?

Dream, write, shoot and edit.  There are many different platforms available where you can showcase your ability, take advantage of them.  I would also tell other black, female creatives not to get preoccupied with optics. You are going to have to work with people who don’t look like you, who aren’t the same gender as you, who have a different background than you etc.  My undergrad program is being completed at Rowan University. I attended this college for the hands-on TV / Film Production and New Media program. It was important to me to select an institution where I can develop, grow and also have a solid foundation in liberal arts without going into massive debt.  That being said, the school is maybe 10-percent Black and my major seems to be around 85-percent male. I never let any of those things discourage me and thus far, my experience has been awesome. I volunteer extensively and often have the opportunity to address large audiences of Black and Hispanic students.  Sometimes, people just need to see something done to know that it can be done. Everyone loves Ava and Shondra and Issa. It wasn’t an easy road for any of them. They braved discomfort and stand as an inspiration for countless women of all races.

Why do you feel is it important to have our voices represented in this industry?

There is value in each of our experiences; women need to find our own voices, control the narrative and take ownership of our portrayal in television, film and new media.  Similarly, these industries need to tune into, and be empathetic to the needs of various audiences. The film industry cannot be a monolithic arena and expect to be relevant with diverse communities.  Film has to serve our communities, and reflect it. That is why I feel it is important to have our voices represented.

How can we find you? (website/social media handles)

My website is www.bibbyfame.com; this is the most comprehensive source and includes links to my socials.  On Instagram, my personal profile is @bibbyfame and company is @bibbyfamedigital.

Anything else you would like to share?

I’d like to thank you, Alana Marie for providing a platform for female filmmakers to express themselves and share information about each of our respective journeys.  Having the #BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries is particularly special during Women’s History Month. I respect and appreciate your vision. Personally, I also make a point to share information and serve as a resource to other women seeking careers in the industry whenever and however I can.

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries||Tirrea Billings

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries||Tirrea Billings

For this week of the #BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries, we had the opportunity to speak with Tirrea Billings, a filmmaker with a social justice niche and grad student from Michigan.

How long have you been in the industry and what made you want to go into this field?

I’ve been in this industry professionally for two years, however, my passion for film began in 2014 when I took a new media studies class my sophomore year of college. I declared the Film, Video, Media Studies major at Western Michigan University my junior year. Then, I became involved with media-related organizations on campus such as Young Broadcasters of Tomorrow and Bronco Productions. I also completed several internships during my undergrad career with organizations like the Public Media Network and ImageStream Creative Communications.

After graduating in December of 2016, I began freelancing in 2017 as a production assistant for companies like HGTV, TLC, ESPN3, and Rogan Productions. I also landed my first client, the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, who hired me to do a promo video for their website. From there, I began getting consistent clientele mainly with companies and nonprofits rooted in social justice.

2017 paved the way and laid the foundation for the birth of my company, Reflct Media Group. Launched January of 2018, Reflct Media Group is a film and video production company that specializes in documentary-style storytelling in the areas of social justice, human rights, and the experiences of people of color. We ensure that people who are or have been marginalized have a platform to be heard, and we aim to be catalysts for change through film. Storytelling is our passion. Film is the medium.

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries

Have you ever dealt with imposter syndrome in this industry? If so, how did you overcome that?

I don’t think I have a psychological fear of being exposed as a fraud, per se. However, I definitely struggle with always doubting my accomplishments. I’ve just always been extremely hard on myself and never satisfied. I always need to be doing more, being better, etc. I’ve struggled with this since the beginning of time. I’ve been trying to be more intentional about patting myself on the back, taking breaks and being proud of my journey, but it’s hard.

I also think I’d be a lot happier if I moved out of Michigan. But I don’t have a rich family that can pay my rent and bills while I “figure it out.” I don’t have a crutch or a support system I can lean on. So, I have to be strategic. Great things take time I guess, but I am proud of the foundation I’ve built here and the relationships that have manifested. I know that one day, I’ll be able to fulfill my big city dreams. In the meantime, one of my mentors, Mia Henry, told me that it’s better to be a big fish in a small pond. So, I’ve been focusing on building a platform and foundation that will eventually lead me into the direction I want to go to. “You have such a strong presence here in Kalamazoo. I think you shouldn’t be so hung up on not living in a big city right now. You’re young. You have time. Bigger cities mean more competition with more people who are better than you and who have been doing this longer than you have. Grow where you are planted, perfect your craft, and the opportunities will come to you. Why move if you can work hard here until eventually, people will be paying you to go to them.” So I have been taking her advice.

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries

What would you identify as your most successful moment up to this point in your career?

To this day, the most successful moment I’ve had in my career is winning an award for the first documentary-short I ever created. It’s called Painting Dreams: The Story of Johnson Simon. It’s about a former Western Michigan University student who is a painter with cerebral palsy. The film documents his experience of being a college student with a disability, and how he uses art to cope with his disability. It got an honorable mention at the 2016 BEA Festival of Media Arts. To have won an award on my first piece of work meant a lot to me, and it was the affirmation I needed to know that documentary filmmaking is “my thing.”

How would you describe your artistic style?

Artistically, I’m a very minimal planner. I go into a documentary project with an idea of what I want the end result to be, but I definitely leave enough room and creative space to allow a story to tell itself. I think there’s more authenticity that way. I kind of let the story be the director, and I’m just the one that puts it all together.

Do you have a film bucket list? If so, what are you still wanting to do?

There’s SO much on my film bucket list, both with my company and as a personal filmmaker. One day, I hope my company grows to scale to where we can be the next Kartemquin Films to not only tell amazing stories (WITH funding because I’m going broke paying for everything out of pocket!) but also offer development programming for filmmakers and become advocates for documentary film. I want to create a film that wins at Sundance. I want to work on a team with Ava DuVernay (or at least meet her…she’s my idol). I want to create documentary content for HBO or Netflix. And like, I’d even be satisfied to just be nominated for an Oscar. I wouldn’t even have to win!

What would you say to other Black female creatives wanting to break into the industry?

To other Black female creatives wanting to break into the industry, figure out what exactly you want for yourself and then get to work. Don’t wait for permission, and don’t be afraid to kick down your own doors of opportunity when no one will open them for you. Network, find your support system, and seek resources that will help you get to where you want to be. There’s no right way to do it or one best path to take. You have to figure out what’s best for you. Don’t compare your journey to others and remember that slow and steady wins the race.

It’s hard being Black AND being a woman in this industry. I’ve been stereotyped many times, and I’m pretty sure I’ve been denied jobs because of it. Everyone assumes that my partner is the CEO of our company because he’s a man. When he corrects them and tells them that it’s me, they’re shocked. But, confidence is key. Once you establish that you’re the HBIC in the room, you’ll gain the respect and the opportunities that you deserve. Wear your crown, don’t be afraid to communicate what you want, never settle, and be bold because that’s what it takes to make it in this industry.

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries

Why do you feel is it important to have our voices represented in this industry?

It’s important to have our voices represented in this industry because everyone deserves to see (positive) representation of themselves, especially in the media and film industry. Our views and perceptions of the world are shaped by what we see, hear, and experience. The media and film industry play a huge role in that. Too often, we’re left out of our own narratives and have no control of our self-image. However, with the rise of technology and social media, it’s easier now more than ever to create and be immersed in content that is representative of our unique, lived experiences. We still have a long way to go, but I think we’re heading in the right direction and are actively fighting a system that’s been predominately white for too long. By increasing our visibility and normalizing our stories, we’re able to celebrate us and more importantly, show our children that consume what they watch on TV that we can also be superheroes, doctors, writers, activists, chefs, authors, and regular human beings, and not just the underdeveloped and stereotyped characters that have saturated the industry for too long.

How can we find you? (website/social media handles)

I’m everywhere!

Twitter, IG, Facebook: @reflctmedia (company) & @tirreab (personal)

Vimeo: vimeo.com/reflctmedia

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/reflctmedia

Web: reflctmedia.com

Anything else you would like to share?

Being a creative is hard. I often want to give up and just work a regular 9-5. There are no days off as a creative, especially as a creative entrepreneur. I go to work, come home and then do more work for my company. I am also in graduate school. I am tired all. of. the. time. But when I think about even the possibility of manifesting my wildest dreams, the work is worth it. As I said before, slow and steady wins the race, don’t compare your journey to anyone else’s, connect with other creatives, and figure out what you want for yourself and go for it. No one is stopping you but you. Appreciate your journey and trust the process. I started off with a camera, a crappy tripod and a basic microphone. Now, I have a company! So, I’d like to think that I’m doing something right. 😉

If you haven’t had a chance to read up on the other talented women in the #BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries, get caught up on Brittney Janae’s story here and Joyce Fitzpatrick story here.

 

 

 

 

 

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries || Joyce Fitzpatrick

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries || Joyce Fitzpatrick

Kicking off week 2 of the #BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries, I talked to Joyce Fitzpatrick. Joyce is a triple threat within the industry – writer, director and producer housed in Los Angeles.

How long have you been in the industry and what made you want to go into this field?

I’ve been in the industry since 1991, which is a long time.  Being from the midwest, I watched a lot of tv and movies, read tons of books and learned to play lots of instruments.  There wasn’t much to do in Indianapolis, but I truly enjoyed my childhood and teenage years growing up there. I love old movies and watched a lot of “good” tv and “bad” tv. However, I noticed there wasn’t a lot of diversity on the three big networks at the time.  Cable was just starting and I felt that one race was consistently represented in every genre but not Blacks, Hispanics, Asians or indigenous people. You’d only see us in stereotypical roles and situations, i.e. living in poverty, or as slaves, killers, butlers or maids.

I wanted to see more diversity in all genres from the pioneer days, to suburbia, to outer space, but it didn’t exist, except on Star Trek..Lol. That motivated me to want to get into telling stories about black lives that reflected various experiences and genres. That’s why I went into the film and television industry. I wanted to speak from the experiences that I knew and learned about from my life and through family and friends. I know there are so many great stories out there and I can’t wait to see more and more of them from creatives of color.

Joyce on set.

Have you ever dealt with imposter syndrome in this industry? If so, how did you overcome that?

I’ve worked for different entities with male bosses and they have often made me feel like I did not belong in the position I held.  Even though I worked very hard and often harder than my peers, and I’ve tolerated berating & condescending remarks, I stayed confident, strong and patient. To this day, I thank those individuals who tried to make me feel inadequate because they made me even more confident and stronger in my abilities than I ever thought I could be.  I’ve learned that when others try to make you feel less than, they are really feeling that way themselves and you shouldn’t let them intimidate you. That’s it!

What would you identify as your most successful moment up to this point in your career?

Wow….I’ve had a few successful moments in my career that I think about from time to time. I really can’t pinpoint just one moment, but there have been a few situations that I’ve felt blessed.  Having an audience see my work in a movie theater or on a television network was a great feeling. It feels good to know that your work has made it that far.

There is one memory that I always keep close to my heart.  It was the very first time I wrote a comedy sketch for a national television show titled, “The Newz” for UPN. This was a long time ago because UPN is now CW. Back then, I was flown out to Universal Studios to see my sketch performed live by the comedy ensemble from the show in front of a live audience.  If you google “The Cat From Hell” on the tv show the NEWZ you can watch it. It was a surreal experience and anyone reading this who is a television writer, you feel strange when a live audience is laughing at your jokes. I just stood on the sidelines near the stage and just watched the audiences responses. They laughed so much and I enjoyed it, but it felt really strange.  I think it was because this was the very first thing I EVER wrote and it made it on national television network. I can’t explain it, but that was one of my most memorable moments working in this business.

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries

How would you describe your artistic style?  

My artistic style when it comes to directing is about telling a good story with amazing backdrops and wardrobes, like in “Black Panther.”  Now, I do love old movies where the women are dressed to kill in amazing dresses and gowns with vivid colors aka technicolor like in the “old” days. But I also think there are amazingly talented DP’s out there who can see how to interpret my story in ways that I may not even imagine.  I also like bigger-than-life action which also involve dramatic and amazing back drops, like old sleepy towns, sweeping valley and beautiful country sides. At the end of the day, I just want to tell good, fun, scary or heartfelt stories that move people and make them think and if style plays a huge part in that, then great.

I’m not a big fan of romantic comedies, but I actually wrote one called  “African American in Paris” which was an award-winning screenplay, and it follows the “Walter Smitty” style of storytelling which involves great locations about Europe which help to tell the story.  

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries

Do you have a film bucket list? If so, what are you still wanting to do?

I would love to make some fun and memorable horror films and mysteries. Or even some fun comedies because I’m not too serious. I like to have fun, so if I could do lots of projects that make people scream, laugh and watch my films over and over again, I’m good.

What would you say to other Black female creatives wanting to break into the industry?

Get out and just get started.  It is such a great time in history to be black and female.  What I would like to see more of is women of color helping each other. I still see a lot of “crabs in the barrel” syndrome.  I’ve been at events, on sets with most of the stars you see today and I hate to say this, but I’ve gotten death stares from these people for no reason and particularly women.  It’s really sad. I’m not a stalker, but I see some of these actors on some of our most popular shows at film festivals, Hollywood functions, etc. and they just stare you down. Unless your Ava Duvernay or Oprah, they look at you like you shouldn’t be there, but the thing is you are, so why can’t we chat?

It’s crazy. I just keep my nose to the grindstone and keep letting my work speak for me. I also try to help other up and coming women of color in this industry, because we have all needed a helping hand at some point in our careers and why not help someone who you know is talented. Hey, if they’re more talented than you, don’t be jealous. Pull them in and maybe collaborate with them and create something wonderful!

#BlackFemaleFilmmakerSeries


Why do you feel is it important to have our voices represented in this industry?

The industry needs to reflect the dollars it takes from its consumers and most of those are people of color.  We have tolerated not seeing ourselves in Hollywood for far too long and I think the timing couldn’t be better, but people have to stay on it. It’s important that if you are going to start a fight, you have to finish it and it’s a long battle.  I loved “Black Panther” and “Crazy Rich Asians” and there needs to be more of that and I hope Hollywood is watching and listening to its consumers.

How can we find you? (website/social media handles)
Websites https://www.flatcat-productions.com/
                            https://www.thecolorofmedicine.com/
                            http://www.animalcontroltv.com/

Instagram: @fitzpatrickjoyce
Twitter:  @ProducerJoyce
Facebook pages 

Anything else you would like to share?

I think it’s great to share our experiences that include the good and the bad because this Hollywood life isn’t all “Glitz” and “Glamour.” It’s a business and a harsh one at that, and people need to know about it.  It will eat you up and spit you out if you aren’t grounded. I think the “Me too” movement is showing us that. But, it is still one of the most attractive careers out there. It has it’s attraction, but it can bite too.